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 Virtual Civil War Museum Of Georgia

*****

Lost Mountain

The far left of the Confederate lines before Kennesaw Mountain were anchored on Lost Mountain, with the old Post Office as CS Cavalry headquarters. Jackson's Cavalry manned this extreme end of the lines, and a pitched battle was fought on the north side of the mountain by Stoneman's Union Cavalry . The line was abandoned on the night of June15, with the Confederates falling back to Mud Creek several miles in the rear.

Bullets and Artifacts

(Found By Robert Holder)

Camp Items

(Found By Robert Holder)

Breast Plates, belt plate, and Carbine Buckles

(Found By Robert Holder)

(above photos courtesy of Barry Banks, www.civilwaroutpost.com)

 

*****

 Gilgal Church

On June 15, 1864, Hooker's Twentieth Corps attacked the Confederate lines manned by Cleburne's Division, at the site of Gilgal Church. On the Union right, at 2 pm Daniel Butterfield advanced his 3rd Division under fire from Confederate cannons, finally halting and fortifying. Meanwhile, on his left, John Geary's 2nd Division also attacked, but was repulsed by by Cleburne's strongly fortified troops, aided by fire from eighteen Confederate cannon. Today, the area is known as Due West community, and the site of the old church sits near where Due West school today stands.

Georgia Box Plate from CS Picket line

(Found By Butch Holcombe)

Artifacts from around the battle site

(found by Butch Holcombe)

Carved Bullet From Burnt Hickory Road Hospital Site

(found by Butch Holcombe)

*****

Wheelers Cavalry actions in North Cobb

While the battles raged to the west, Wheelers CS Cavalry guarded the right flank, operating up and down the Belles Ferry Road. Clashing almost daily with Garrard's US Cavalry, this action was called by Sherman "the most significant of the entire campaign."

Artifacts recovered along the Bells Ferry & Canton Roads

(Found by Butch Holcombe)

CS Spur from near Bells Ferry Road

(Found By Earl Young)

*****

Latimore's House

On June 16, 1864, the Confederate left swung back from Lost Mountain to a new position near Mud Creek.  The "hinge" of this movement was near the site of the Latimore house. Federals attacked this position in earnest on June 18, and although the heavy CS earthworks held, Johnston abandoned the position that night due to the exposed position of the salient. This salient was located behind the present day New Salem Church, and the massive earthworks can still be seen today. Construction of a road recently nearby lead to the discovery of a camp of French's Division, as well as several shell impact areas.

CSA Belt Plate

(Camp of French's Division)

(Found By Butch Holcombe)

Other artifacts from the camp

(found by Butch Holcombe)

*****

Dead Angle (Cheatham's Hill)

On June 27th,  George H. Thomas attacked a salient 21/2 miles south of Little Kennesaw mountain defended by Cleburn's Confederate troops. This was one of the few occasions of the entire war that "European Tactics" were used; that is, five brigades advanced across a front of only 250 yards. Once upon the works, the Yankees massed together twelve ranks deep for the final attack. The losses were staggering among Thomas's men, the highest of any engagement of the entire campaign. At one point the leaves caught fire, and a truce was declared long enough to remove the wounded Yankees to safety, a task which many Confederates helped in.  Although the actual battle ground is National Park, much of the surrounding private areas saw skirmishes and campgrounds of the troops. Over the years several camps have been located by relic hunters, often by the construction of yet another subdivision

Engraving depicting the truce at  Dead Angle

 

ID Badge: Ithel Town, 5th Conn. Vols.    

From Field Hospital near Dead Angle

(found by Butch Holcombe)

Artifacts from Yankee camp and Field Hospital near Dead Angle

(found by Butch Holcombe)

  

Relics from North End of Dead Angle Battle

(found by Butch Holcombe)

  

Carved 14th Corps badge

Found at "Bald Hill", near Dead Angle

(found by Butch Holcombe)

Carved Williams Cleaner Bullet base

Found at "Bald Hill", near Dead Angle

(found by Butch Holcombe)

 

Whale (or Turtle) Head carved from bullet

Found at "Bald Hill", near Dead Angle

(found by Butch Holcombe)

*****

Kolbs Farm

June 22nd, 1864, saw Schofield and Hooker's troops advancing on the Powder Springs Road. They took up a defensive position 600 yards east of the McAdoo house, and begin constructing works made of logs and rails. This overlooked 600 acres of cleared land belonging to the widow of Peter Valentine Kolb. Hood made little or no reconnaissance to determine the strength of the army in front of him, and ordered a full assault, with no consultation of his commander, Gen Joseph E Johnston.  The results were disastrous, a preview of what was to later come when Hood took over command of the Confederate army in Atlanta soon thereafter. Nowadays, the area of Powder Springs Road is being developed, and much of the battlefield not on Federal Park Property is now under subdivisions, as well as County property (including the town dump).

Artifacts from the assembly area of Hoods army before the attack

(Found by Butch Holcombe)

*****

Olley's Creek

After being bloodied by the direct assaults around Kennesaw Mountain, Sherman continued his flanking strategy on the Confederate left. He met skirmishers from Ross's Cavalry near the Cheney house, and once Ross took up a position overlooking Olley's Creek south of there, assaulted his dismounted troopers in their earth works. Once the troopers were driven from this position, Johnston was forced to withdraw his entire army several miles to the south to avoid being cut off from Atlanta. As with many other areas of Cobb County, this once pristine and historic site is now a sea of apartments and condominiums.

Relics from Ross's defensive position overlooking Olley's Creek

(found by Butch Holcombe)

Knife (top) with "US" filed off for use by a Confederate Trooper. (Bottom example is for comparison only.)

(found by Butch Holcombe)

*****

Georgia Military Institute

From 1851 until 1864, the Georgia Military Institute, located on Powder Springs Road near downtown Marietta, thrived. At that time, the Union Army took it over as a hospital and camp, and burned it as they were leaving. During it's heyday, many a young male was schooled in the ways of the South here, with a very academic schedule as well as rigorous military drills. Quite a few years after the institute was burned, the main building was rebuilt and used as the Marietta Country Club, with a golf course on much of the campus. Nowadays, a new modern building houses the Marietta Conference Center, and little looks as it did in the past on "College Hill" .

Grouping of GMI Cadet Buttons

(found by Larry Holcombe)

 

GMI Buttons found in Marietta, including the rare staff officer version shown on right.

(found by Bobby Westbrook)

 Many of these GMI Buttons were found in one area, leading to the discovery of the parade grounds. Many there were flattened by being lost, and then constantly marched over.

(found by Scott Riddle)

 

Belt Plates and Cross Plates found at the site of the campus

(found by Scott Riddle)

 

Relics sifted from trash pit located at the GMI site. Both Cadet items and those of the invading Union Soldiers were recovered from it.

(found by Butch Holcombe)

*****

Savannah

After leaving Atlanta, Sherman's Army cut it's supply lines and marched across Georgia in a swath sixty miles wide. The troops foraged for there food from nearby farms and plantations, leaving destruction in their path and breaking the fighting spirit of the citizens of Georgia (part of Sherman's goal). He arrived at Savannah on December 10th, 1864, but it wasn't until nearly Christmas that his troops took over the city. In a telegraph to President Abe Lincoln, he "presented him the city of Savannah as a Christmas gift".  Even before the siege in 1864, Savannah was a military town, with many local Confederate units and before that, early US army troops. This is evident in some of the unique artifacts that are recovered there today.

                 

Civil War Era Photographs  of the Savannah Area

Confederate Artillery Button found in downtown Savannah

(Found by Carol Phillips)

Confederate Officer's Button

(Found by Carol Phillips)

Mississippi Infantry Button

(Found by Rick Phillips)

North Carolina Military Institute Button

(Found by Rick Phillips)

 

1845 coin with John Brown carved on front and 1853 carved on reverse

(Found by Rick Phillips)

 1858 half dime carved into a spur rowel from the Rebel Barracks

(Found by Rick Phillips)


Early French 90th Regiment button

(Found by Rick Phillips)

CS two-piece belt Plate

(Found by Rick Phillips)

Sword Plate and Buttons From  Plantation

(Found By Patrick McDonald)

NC Hornets Nest Military Institute Button Found near old Town of Hardwick

(Found By Patrick McDonald)

 

 

 

                  

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